coolchicksfromhistory:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

mildhorror:

Here’s the link for more information about the PS244 fundraising campaign

Here’s the link to the GIVE IT ALL TO ME Library Collection at OutofPrintClothing.com.

Check it out! The good folks dropped me a line about this project last week, and I’m happy to boost for Library Week.

Signal boost

Tags: signal boost

themarysue:

We noticed that we’re getting real close to 20k Tumblr followers, so we’re giving away season one of Orphan Black to a lucky member of our lovely Tumblr community, and you could win it. Here’s how!
Follow us on Tumblr.
Like and reblog this post.
Do it before noon Eastern Time on Friday, April 18th.
That’s it! That’s all you need to do. We will randomly choose one winner once the duration of the contest is over, and contact them through Fan Mail in order to get their shipping info. Now here’s the fine print:
The prize is the 3 disc DVD set of Orphan Black season one that the Orphan Black Tumblr so nicely sent to Jill.
We will ship the prize to the US and Canada, so if you don’t live there (or have understanding acquaintances who could forward your package to you), we advise you not to enter.
If you do not follow our Tumblr, you will be disqualified.
We ask you kindly not to spam your followers by reblogging the post over and over, but hey, we’re not the boss of you.
Good luck! And remember, get your likes and reblogs in by noon this Friday!

themarysue:

We noticed that we’re getting real close to 20k Tumblr followers, so we’re giving away season one of Orphan Black to a lucky member of our lovely Tumblr community, and you could win it. Here’s how!

That’s it! That’s all you need to do. We will randomly choose one winner once the duration of the contest is over, and contact them through Fan Mail in order to get their shipping info. Now here’s the fine print:

  • The prize is the 3 disc DVD set of Orphan Black season one that the Orphan Black Tumblr so nicely sent to Jill.
  • We will ship the prize to the US and Canada, so if you don’t live there (or have understanding acquaintances who could forward your package to you), we advise you not to enter.
  • If you do not follow our Tumblr, you will be disqualified.
  • We ask you kindly not to spam your followers by reblogging the post over and over, but hey, we’re not the boss of you.

Good luck! And remember, get your likes and reblogs in by noon this Friday!

Tags: why not?

technochocolate:

The front claws of a pangolin are so long they are unfit for walking.

(via underthenerdhood)

Tags: pangolins!

(Source: infixe, via merfology)

sundays might be made for liquor spiked samoa milkshakes

lipsredasroses:

image

This add on for firefox allows you to save articles, books, etc. It generates footnotes, citations, etc. It will even create your bibliography for you. There is a video on the site showing all the cool shit zotero can do. When my professor told me about this I probably looked like a kid on Christmas morning opening gifts. Typing up footnotes and bibliographies is a pain in the ass. Best damn thing ever. It will do citations for Chicago style, MLA, and APA (maybe more but I haven’t looked). 

(via counterpunches)

atlasobscura:

CappadociaNevşehir Province, Turkey

Located in the Central Anatolian region of Turkey, Cappadocia is an area where entire cities have been carved into rock.

An area with history so abundant and far reaching as to render entire centuries as footnotes at first glance, the landscape appears as an abandoned alien desert with fields that look like waves frozen in time, and rocky spikes and spires protruding from the landscape like some sort of meringue set in stone.

However on further exploration through small, winding paths, beautifully-carved homes and churches are waiting to be discovered.

The rock formations that make up Cappadocia were created by volcanic eruptions, erosion, and wind. Over three million years ago a volcanic eruption deposited a blanket of ash across the 1500 square mile landscape which formed into a soft rock. This rock, slowly eaten away by wind and time, has created some spectacular forms. But the human history of the area is as compelling as the geological one.

For so much more on Cappadocia, keep reading on Atlas Obscura…

(via thehappysorceress)

from89:

Paper-Cut Light Boxes by Hari & Deepti

You Can Also Find Me -:

Skumar’s :- Twitter | Facebook | We Heart It | Pinterest | Subscribe

Other Blog :- India Incredible | Facebook

(via thehappysorceress)

staceythinx:

Some of the 14 Spectacular Basalt Formations assembled for a beautiful and informative gallery by The World Geography.

(via naviwing)

gigi-tastic:

nautical-constructs:

killa-kelly:

emilet:

1los:

Bees are nature’s 3D printer

Fucking bees are the best.

Fuck yes they are.

what the actual fuck bees. why are you engineering geniuses

If I weren’t deathly allergic I would be a bee keeper 

(Source: 1los, via gigi2690)

bobbycaputo:

Developer Trays

Pictures were not always “made” instantly by clicking the shutter button and uploading them to computers or mobile devices. Taking the picture was only the first step in the picture-making process. A photographer’s life consisted of hours, days, weeks, months spent in a very  dark room filled with chemicals that expose and fix their images to paper. An essential tool in that process is the developer tray – the vehicle that holds the various liquids that develop, stop, and fix your exposed image and create a print. It has been a very private place for the image-maker, which is why master photography printer John Cyr‘s new book, Developer Trays, is such a treat. Beautifully documented trays from many noted photographers are included in the 144-page, hardcover book available now through powerHouse books. 

(Continue Reading)

(via counterpunches)

ruineshumaines:

Electric Blossom by Torkil Gudnason.

hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

(via merfology)